Reviews

SMART PEOPLE

Huntington Theatre Company, Boston, MA

“The Huntington cast is just superb… Delivering… multifaceted performances are Eunice Wong as Ginny Yang, a Chinese–Japanese–American professor of psychology at Harvard who studies race and identity among Asian–American women but has some thorny identity and control issues of her own, manifested in compulsive shopping (Ginny makes some pointed remarks about Asian–Americans being left out of the dialogue on race)…”
– Don Aucoin, THE BOSTON GLOBE
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“Perhaps the most touching vignettes are those in which Ginny [Eunice Wong] – a certified MacArthur “genius” and, by day, a force to be reckoned with – takes on the telephonic gorgons of customer service. By turns imperious and masochistic, she clearly craves the battle: victory – i.e., being granted “an exception” – has a special resonance for her. And that taste for victimization will surface in a seduction scenario that will (it’s intended to) make your flesh crawl. All four actors are brilliant in their assigned roles… And if there’s any justice in the world, this play – like its predecessor, Stick Fly, which played Broadway – will find its way to New York, to foment further discussion.”
– Sandy Macdonald, THEATERMANIA
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“While each actor brings something special to the table, Wong stands out as best encapsulating the seesaw uncertainty between power and powerlessness with Yang, a sexually proficient overachiever who helps others question their racial baggage partly so she won’t have to examine her own scars. In one devastating scene with White, she gains the upper hand by reverting to an inherently powerless stereotype of an Asian woman. It is a side of Yang we instantly believe was always there because Wong has created so many nuanced layers in her character.
– Craig Idlebrook, NEW ENGLAND THEATRE GEEK

“This drawback almost completely fades in light of the character of Ginny [Eunice Wong]. Ginny’s arc is arguably the most powerful in the play. She is the racial minority who has “made it,” the self–proclaimed wunderkind, the impatient, Blackberry–dependent, shopping–addicted, type–A striver who conceals multiple explosive passions: compassion for the oppressed Asian–American women she works with, growing affection for a man who resents her significant achievements, and rage at the systematic institutional discrimination that has forced her to push herself beyond endurance. Wong kept me mesmerized, and the more glimpses of Ginny’s conflicts that she carefully chose to reveal, the more that I appreciated the intelligence of Diamond’s text and the opportunities that text provides for talented actors.
– Fabiana Cabral, MY ENTERTAINMENT WORLD

And Ginny’s certainly the smartest thing in the play – we long to spend more time with her.  …[W]hen dealing with [the African–American characters, the play] offers nothing nearly as probing as the great scene in which Ginny weeps over a series of online shopping menus which offer her no actual person to abuse (and thus no way to validate her superior status).”
– Thomas Garvey, THE HUB REVIEW


Photo by Carol Rosegg

THE INTELLIGENT DESIGN OF JENNY CHOW

Atlantic Theater Company, NYC

“Jenny Chow is an android, played with touching, subtle impassivity by Eunice Wong in the evening’s best performance.”
– Michael Feingold, THE VILLAGE VOICE
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“Only when our neurotic protagonist unveils her greatest creation – a flying robot doppelganger who goes by the name Jenny Chow (Eunice Wong) – does the action…come alive… Wong is charming and radiant as the robot.”
– David Cote, TIME OUT NEW YORK

“Jenny, as played by Eunice Wong, develops [visible humanity] only gradually. When first she appears near the end of the first act, all you can see is her hand jutting out from a shipping box and making some rudimentary gestures. But before long she’s completely assembled and resembling a young woman; her voice still has an unmistakably halting, electronic ring, and her movements still look mechanical, but as she learns to perform basic tasks and simple dance steps, her body and face limber up to reveal a minute if real sense of change and growth you never expected to see.”
– Matthew Murray, TALKIN’ BROADWAY


Photo by Scott Suchman

THE INTELLIGENT DESIGN OF JENNY CHOW

Studio Theater, DC

“…the performances are among the most accomplished of the year. All six actors are swell, and three in particular are sensational: Eunice Wong as Jennifer, the robot–builder; James Flanagan…and Cameron McNary… It’s a lot of exposition, but thanks in part to [director David] Muse’s imaginative staging, not nearly as dense as it sounds. It helps, too, that [playwright Rolin] Jones anchors all the whimsy in the touching evocation of Jennifer’s despair, and that Wong is able to balance so sensitively the arrogant and desperate facets of Jennifer’s nature… All through “Jenny Chow” there are reminders of the tension between Jennifer’s scientific virtuosity and her irrational fears. And an audience comes clearly to understand how her obsessive need for superficial order is the mask for an explosive inner turmoil.”
– Peter Marks, WASHINGTON POST
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“…Eunice Wong, who’s the formidable center of an admirably solid ensemble… She’s more action–comic character than believable young adult, and yet [playwright Rolin] Jones’ spiky dialogue and Wong’s vital, vulnerable performance somehow conspire to make audiences identify with her instantly.”
–Trey Graham, WASHINGTON CITY PAPER

“A dissonant symphony of tics and repeated actions, Miss Wong is cheerily arrogant and utterly convincing as the hermetically sealed Jennifer, but she also reveals the raw torment of a young woman suffering under warring compulsions.”
– Jayne Blanchard, WASHINGTON TIMES

“Chinese–Canadian actress Eunice Wong plows into the character of Jennifer Marcus with the force of a supernova. Her brave, thoughtful performance could carry a one–woman show.”
– Ann Limpert, THE WASHINGTONIANM

“Studio Theatre’s cast is unassailable… But it’s Wong’s show, and she navigates her complex character’s many talents, flaws and mood swings with ease. Her breakdown is riveting, particularly since we’re so heavily invested in her character’s fate by the time it occurs.”
– Missy Frederick, DCist

“The performances [director David] Muse gets from his first–rate cast are all snappy… But the weight of the show ultimately rests on Wong’s slender but very capable shoulders… Wong imbues [Jennifer] with an acute lack of self–awareness, even as the character flits about with her compulsive rituals, repeatedly spraying the air with disinfectant and washing her hands. [Playwright Rolin] Jones’ method here is to fill the air with Jenny’s stream, no, make that river, of consciousness, and Wong delightfully succeeds.”
– Michael Toscano, THEATERMANIA


FAUST IN LOVE (Goethe’s Faust 1.2)

Target Margin Theater, NYC

“But Faust in Love’s triumph belongs to Eunice Wong, who makes a soaring transformation (as Gretchen) from a girl’s loving purity into a destroyed woman’s wretchedness and ultimate redemption. Her summoning of strength powers the final scene’s conflict of great forces, turning night into day.”
– Tom Sellar, THE VILLAGE VOICE
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“Eunice Wong plays Gretchen with unforced purity of temperament, finding a mercurial logic in the madness that eventually claims her.”
– Gordon Cox, NEWSDAY

“As Gretchen, Eunice Wong proves to be a mesmerizing and sympathetic spitfire, equally comfortable with the character’s naive side and her later, more carnal nature.”
– Andy Propst, AMERICAN THEATRE WEB


Photo by Sue Rees

ANTIGONE

National Asian American Theatre Company (NAATCO), NYC

“Eunice Wong is a fierce, angry, and moving Antigone, portraying the title character both as a fragile, scared child, and as a raging fury who will challenge everyone who crosses her path.”
– Warren Hoffman, TALKIN’ BROADWAY

“…Eunice Wong’s passionate rendering of Antigone. Wong’s performance makes the chorus’ description of the young woman as being “so noble and unafraid” seem to be an understatement.”
– Andy Propst, AMERICAN THEATRE WEB

“Eunice Wong portrayed Sophocles’ strong, law–breaking, loyal–to–death heroine with the perfect mix of passion, rigidity, fury, fear and delicacy.”
– Dorothy Tso, SHOW BUSINESS WEEKLY


Photo by Meghan Kriegel

AN INFINITE ACHE

Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, OH
Merrimack Repertory Theater, MA

“But what particularly struck me…is the strength of the acting…Wong in particular must depict a run of emotional changes over a short time, particularly as it involves a great tragedy. Her ability to quickly capture the emotion her character feels is truly astounding. It’s one of the finest performances I’ve seen on stage.”
– Patrick Meighan, THE TELEGRAPH, NH

“Actors taking on this play have to able to fast forward from one moment and emotion to the next and also create characters that evolve over time. Under Greg Leaming’s direction, both [David] Josefsberg as Charles and Eunice Wong as Hope do very well at those challenges… Wong hits her peak in a tragic scene that’s written rather melodramatically, but she plays it with such honest intensity that it almost seems out of sync with the rest of the show.”
– David Brooks Andrews, METRO–WEST DAILY NEWS

“…David Josefsberg and Eunice Wong are wonderful, especially Ms. Wong… Hope is a compelling study of a fierce young woman.”
– Carl A. Rossi, THE THEATER MIRROR: NEW ENGLAND’S LIVE THEATER GUIDE

“Wong’s Hope evolves from an edgy young woman to a sexy lover and wife, tender mother, distraught housewife, smart career woman, angry mistress, and achingly sympathetic elder.”
– Nancye Tuttle, THE LOWELL SUN

In their carefully characterized performances, Wong and [Mark] Alhadeff depict the pair at their various moments of truth and trust, sorrow and joy, parenthood and age, adding up toward the infinite ache of abiding love. It is a subtle, somewhat quiet play, but the action moves swiftly…
– Bob White, THE OXFORD PRESS


Photo by Tom Bloom

SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER

The Pearl Theatre, NYC

“…Eunice Wong is alluringly coquettish…”
– Wilborn Hampton, THE NEW YORK TIMES

“…[Eunice] Wong’s performance would be reason enough to buy a ticket. She’s wonderful, and the absolute light of the stage whenever she appears. She possesses charm and character in abundance, and appears to be the most gifted comic in the company. The scenes with her at the forefront are the most funny and enjoyable – she never lets you down for a moment.”
– Matthew Murray, TALKINBROADWAY.COM


Photo by Michael Daniel

TOP GIRLS

The Guthrie Theater, MN

Wong displays a flair in her role of Lady Nijo expounding poetry with airy grace and full of remembrances. This contrasts vividly with her confident manner in depicting her character as an office worker.
– Christopher Trussell, THE ST. CLOUD TIMES

[Guthrie] newcomer Wong renders the arch–classical character and then a contemporary office worker with flair.
– Rohan Preston, THE MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE


Photo by Carol Rosegg

THE HOUSE OF BERNARDA ALBA

National Asian American Theatre Company (NAATCO), NYC

“Adela, the youngest and most beautiful, played with fire by Eunice Wong, rebels. While everyone else is indoors in black, she sneaks out in red to meet Pepe.”
– Sarah Boxer, THE NEW YORK TIMES

“Pepe begins a secret affair with the youngest daughter, the scarlet Adela, passionately and willfully represented by Eunice Wong…. This 90–minute tragedy in two cultures is a transcendent experience that is not to be missed.”
– Caraid O’Brien, OFFOFFOFF.COM


Photo by Alexander Khartaev

HOWLING

Yara Arts Group at La MaMa ETC, NYC

“A young hunter (resonant–voiced Eunice Wong) slays a wolf only to find herself forced to endure initiatory trials…At the end, the video screen suddenly filled with silhouettes of real wolves loping over snow, and my eyes filled with tears.”
– Eva Yaa Asantewaa, THE VILLAGE VOICE


FREE MARKET

The Working Theater, NYC

“If I had to name one member of the ensemble as the standout, it would probably be Eunice Wong, whose deadpan humor, spot–on timing, and Mona Lisa expression enhance five of the eight plays.”
– Elyse Sommer, CURTAINUP.COM

“…[Eunice] Wong is Salsita, a shy Mormon girl till she strips down to her sequined bra and does a raunchy Selena imitation…The actors are all excellent, and special note should go to Wong’s petite, wren–like energy…”
– Arlene McKanic, NEW YORK AMSTERDAM NEWS: THE NEW BLACK VIEW

“The cast…show[s] considerable range, especially Eunice Wong and Felix Solis, who display considerable reserves of courage, especially in the last segments which also happen to be the best of the evening.”
– Jason Clark, MATINEE MAGAZINE: ENTERTAINMENT REVIEWS


LOVE’S FIRE

The Berkshires Theatre Festival, MA

“What soars is [Eunice] Wong’s performing Sonnet 118 after Bitter Sauce concludes. While Bogosian’s Bitter Sauce shocked with its use of obscenities and provoked laughter from its non–sequiturs, it was Wong’s performance of the sonnet that was most startling and memorable.”
– James Yeara, METROLAND: THE CAPITAL REGION’S ALTERNATIVE NEWS WEEKLY

“…the sonnets weren’t meant to be read aloud. That may be true, but as voiced by this intelligent young company, particularly [Eunice] Wong and [Amy] Bruce, the words are as eloquent as any that one is likely to hear anywhere else this summer.”
– Ralph Hammann, THE ADVOCATE

“Eunice Wong stands out among the women.”
– Elyse Sommer, CURTAINUP.COM

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